Books

Books:

Free the Animals, by Ingrid Newkirk
This is the true story of how the animal liberation underground started in the US. Every character – including each of the wonderful animals you will come to know – is real flesh and blood. Because the federal government retains an abiding interest in locking up anyone involved in illegally removing animals from those who legally exploit them, it has convened grand juries to investigate the often daring and successful raids you will read about. Understanding how some quite ‘ordinary’ people came to break the law may very well change your life.

Animal Gospel:  Andew Linzey

Our treatment of animals is a gospel issue, Andrew Linzey contends, because those individuals and institutions that could have become the voice of God’s most vulnerable creatures have instead justified cruelty and oppression. He offers an inspiring personal account of the gospel truths that have sustained his commitment to the cause of animals for more than twenty-five years.

My Gentle Barn:  Creating a Sanctuary Where Animals Heal and Children Learn to Hope:  Ellie Laks

Founder Ellie Laks started The Gentle Barn after adopting a sick goat from a run-down petting zoo in 1999. Some two hundred animals later (including chickens, horses, pigs, cows, rabbits, emus, and more), The Gentle Barn has become an extraordinary nonprofit that brings together a volunteer staff of community members and at-risk teens to rehabilitate abandoned and/or abused animals. As Ellie teaches the volunteers to care for the animals, they learn a new language of healing that works wonders on the humans as well.

The Gentle Barn weaves together the story of how the Barn came to be what it is today with Ellie’s own journey. Filled with heartwarming animal stories and inspiring recoveries, The Gentle Barn is a feel-good account that will delight animal lovers and memoir readers alike.

Whole: T. Colin Campbell

The China Study:  The Most Comprehensive Study of Nutrition Ever Conducted And the Startling Implications for Diet, Weight Loss and Long-Term Health:   T. Colin Campbell

The Pig Who Sang to the Moon: The Emotional World of Farm Animals:  Jeffrey Masson

The Lucky Ones:  My Passionate Fight for Farm Animals:  Jenny Brown

Jenny Brown was ten years old when she lost a leg to bone cancer. Throughout the ordeal, her constant companion was a cat named Boogie. Years later, she would make the connection between her feline friend and the farm animals she ate, acknowledging that most of America’s domesticated animals live on industrialized farms, and are viewed as mere production units. Raised in a conservative Southern Baptist family in Kentucky, Brown had been taught to avoid asking questions. But she found her passion and the courage to speak out. 

Whitewash:  The Disturbing Truth About Cow’s Milk and Your Health:  Joseph Keon

Eating Animals:  Jonathan Safran Foer

Food Choice and Sustainability:  Why Buying Lical, Eating Less Meat, and Taking Baby Steps Won’t Work:  Dr. Richard Oppenlander

101 Reasons Why I’m a Vegetarian by Pamela Rice

For many years, Pamela Rice, president of the Vivavegie Society in New York City, has produced the pamphlet 101 Reasons Why I’m a Vegetarian, known to all who have read it as “The Mighty Convincer.” The pamphlet offers in bite-sized pieces the many human health, animal welfare/rights, and environmental reasons why people are choosing a meatless diet.

Now Pamela has written an expanded and fully resourced book-length version of 101 Reasons Why I’m a Vegetarian, filling out the details of her argument and providing up-to-date information, but maintaining her engaging and informed style. She covers everything from the conditions for animals on factory farms to disappearing fish stocks, lagoons of animal waste, high incidences of colon cancer and other diseases, and other information from industry periodicals, newspapers, magazines, Web sites, and other less readily available sources.

101 Reasons Why I’m a Vegetarian The Animal Activist’s Handbook by Matt Ball & Bruce Friedrich

Growl  Life Lessons, Hard Truths, and Bold Strategies from an Animal Advocate:   Kim Stallwood

For four decades, Kim Stallwood has had a front seat in the animal rights movement, starting at the grassroots in England and working his way up to leadership positions at some of the best-known organizations in the world, including Compassion In World Farming, the British Union for the Abolition of Vivisection, and People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals. Yet, as Stallwood reveals in this memoir of an eventful life dedicated to social justice for the voiceless, finding the truest path for progress has meant learning a lot along the way. Equal parts personal narrative, social history, and impassioned call for rethinking animal advocacy, Growl describes Stallwood’s journey from a meat-eating slaughterhouse worker to a vegan activist for all species. He explains the importance of four key values in animal rights philosophy and practice—compassion, truth, nonviolence, and justice—and how a deeper understanding of their role not only leads us to discover our humanity for animals, but also for ourselves.

Humans, Animals and Society eBook:  Nik Taylor

While animals have played a central part in human society over the years, when it comes to the social sciences they have largely been neglected. However, interest in Human–Animal Studies (HAS) has grown exponentially in recent years, giving rise to university and college courses around the world specifically on this compelling and vital subject. Considering topics ranging from the human–animal bond, meat eating, and animals in entertainment, this book presents key concepts in simple and easy-to-understand ways as it covers the breadth of empirical work currently being done in the field. Through an examination of ideas such as anthropocentrism and the social construction of animals, it looks at how animals are symbolically transformed, presented, and re-presented as part of human culture. Ultimately, the book argues that there is nothing “natural” about our social relations with animals, but that animals are made use of and understood through a human lens. Humans, Animals, and Society spans the diverse interests of the HAS community and is necessary reading for students and the general public looking to better understand our relationship with animals.

Terrorists or Freedom Fighters?:  Reflections on the Liberation of Animals: Anthony Nocella

The first anthology of writings on the history, ethics, politics and tactics of the Animal Liberation Front, Terrorists or Freedom Fighters? features both academic and activist perspectives and offers powerful insights into this international organization and its position within the animal rights movement.
Calling on sources as venerable as Thomas Aquinas and as current as the Patriot Act—and, in some cases, personal experience—the contributors explore the history of civil disobedience and sabotage, and examine the philosophical and cultural meanings of words like “terrorism,” “democracy” and “freedom,” in a book that ultimately challenges the values and assumptions that pervade our culture. Contributors include Robin Webb, Rod Coronado, Ingrid Newkirk, Paul Watson, Karen Davis, Bruce Friedrich and others.

Muzzling a Movement:  The Effects of Anti-Terrorism Law, Money and Politcs on Animal Activism by Dara Lovitz

The ability to protest peacefully and to voice unpopular opinions without being arrested and imprisoned arbitrarily are cornerstones of the U.S. Constitution, and are the reasons why, in spite of the many limitations imposed upon sectors of its society over the centuries, the dominant order has been forced to change to allow people of color, women, and others to take their place in society.

Animals raised for their flesh or body products, however, remain without even the most basic natural rights: to move around, to associate with their conspecifics, to breathe clean air, and to nest or wallow or graze. They have no choice but to rely, as do all non-human animals, on human beings to speak up for them and articulate those basic rights, as well as to challenge those who are either indifferent to, or actively complicit in harming, their welfare.

Since the passage of the Animal Enterprise Terrorism Act (AETA) in 2006, however, the ability to document abuses, draw attention to the horrors, and raise public awareness about the suffering of animals in factory farms or scientific laboratories has been substantially curtailed. Muzzling a Movement is an in-depth and tightly argued analysis of the case of the SHAC-7, the organization whose supposed activities ultimately led to the passage of the AETA. Lawyer Dara Lovitz reveals the history behind the AETA, examines the tendentious and speculative government case against the SHAC activists, and in so doing shows how the U.S. government has deeply compromised the freedom of speech and protest enshrined in the Constitution.

The ability to protest peacefully and to voice unpopular opinions without being arrested and imprisoned arbitrarily are cornerstones of the U.S. Constitution, and are the reasons why, in spite of the many limitations imposed upon sectors of its society over the centuries, the dominant order has been forced to change to allow people of color, women, and others to take their place in society.

Animals raised for their flesh or body products, however, remain without even the most basic natural rights: to move around, to associate with their conspecifics, to breathe clean air, and to nest or wallow or graze. They have no choice but to rely, as do all non-human animals, on human beings to speak up for them and articulate those basic rights, as well as to challenge those who are either indifferent to, or actively complicit in harming, their welfare.

Since the passage of the Animal Enterprise Terrorism Act (AETA) in 2006, however, the ability to document abuses, draw attention to the horrors, and raise public awareness about the suffering of animals in factory farms or scientific laboratories has been substantially curtailed. Muzzling a Movement is an in-depth and tightly argued analysis of the case of the SHAC-7, the organization whose supposed activities ultimately led to the passage of the AETA. Lawyer Dara Lovitz reveals the history behind the AETA, examines the tendentious and speculative government case against the SHAC activists, and in so doing shows how the U.S. government has deeply compromised the freedom of speech and protest enshrined in the Constitution.

Mind If I Order the Cheeseburger by Sherry Cobb

What about plants? Don’t animals eat other animals? There are no perfect vegans, so why bother? If you’re vegan, how many times have you been asked these, and other similarly challenging, questions from non-vegans? Using humor and reason, Sherry F. Colb takes these questions at face value and also delves deeply into the motivations behind them, coming up with answers that are not only intelligent but insightful about human nature. Through examples, case studies, and clear-eyed logic, she provides arguments for everything from why veganism is compatible with the world’s major religions to why vegetarianism is not enough. In the end, she shows how it is possible for vegans and non-vegans to engage in a mutually beneficial conversation without descending into counterproductive name-calling, and to work together to create a more hospitable world for human animals and non-human animals alike.

Living Among Meat Eaters:  The Vegetarian’s Survival Handbook by Carol Adams

In print again after a short hiatus, and for the first time also available in a special hardcover-gift edition, Living among Meat Eaters is the book for the over 20 million Americans who have adopted vegetarianism. In this mind-bending yet practical volume, Carol J. Adams discusses summer barbecues, Thanksgiving dinner, even the simple business lunch, which can all be cause for issues-packed discussions on the vegetarian lifestyle. This book also offers more than 50 mouth-watering vegetarian recipes that work! Living among Meat Eaters will continue to be every vegetarian’s (and vegan’s) most trusted source of support and information.

Human – Animal Studies:  A Bibliography – Kindle edition by Margo DeMello

A Primer on Animal Rights by Kim Stallwood

This book is a collection of articles that document how animals are cruelly mistreated and commercially exploited for profit. In doing so, the articles, which are grouped in six primary areas, lay out the fundamental issues of animal rights. All the articles were previously published in The Animals’ Agenda, the leading magazine of the Animal Rights movement. The book contains work by some of the leading authorities on animal protection issues, including: Jim Mason, Marc Bekoff, Mike Markarian, Betsy Swart, Norm Phelps, Wayne Pacelle, Pat Derby, Gene Bauston, Karen Davis, Richard Schwartz, Don Barnes, and many others. All articles are up-to-date and full of important facts.

Why We Love Dogs Eat Pigs, and Wear Cows:  An Introduction to Carnism by Melanie Joy PhD

This ground-breaking work, voted one of the top ten books of 2010 by VegNews Magazine, offers an absorbing look at why and how humans can so wholeheartedly devote ourselves to certain animals and then allow others to suffer needlessly, especially those slaughtered for our consumption.  Social psychologist Melanie Joy explores the many ways we numb ourselves and disconnect from our natural empathy for farmed animals. She coins the term “carnism” to describe the belief system that has conditioned us to eat certain animals and not others.

Life Long Runners by Ruth Heidrich

Defiant Daughters by Carol Adams

When The Sexual Politics of Meat: A Feminist-Vegetarian Critical Theory by Carol J. Adams was published more than twenty years ago, it caused an immediate stir among writers and thinkers, feminists and animal rights activists alike. Never before had the relationship between patriarchy and meat eating been drawn so clearly, the idea that there lies a strong connection between the consumption of women and animals so plainly asserted. But, as the 21 personal stories in this anthology show, the impact of this provocative text on women’s lives continues to this day, and it is as diverse as it is revelatory. One writer attempts to reconcile her feminist-vegan beliefs with her Muslim upbringing; a second makes the connection between animal abuse and her own self-destructive tendencies. A new mother discusses the sexual politics of breastfeeding, while another pens a letter to her young son about all she wishes for him in the future. Many others recall how the book inspired them to start careers in the music business, animal advocacy, and food. No matter whether they first read it in college or later in life, whether they are in their late teens or early forties, these writers all credit The Sexual Politics of Meat in some way with the awakening of their identities as feminists, activists, and women. 

Sistah Vegan by A. Breeze Harper

Sistah Vegan is a series of narratives, critical essays, poems, and reflections from a diverse community of North American black-identified vegans. Collectively, these activists are de-colonizing their bodies and minds via whole-foods veganism. By kicking junk-food habits, the more than thirty contributors all show the way toward longer, stronger, and healthier lives. Suffering from type-2 diabetes, hypertension, high blood pressure, and overweight need not be the way women of color are doomed to be victimized and live out their mature lives. There are healthy alternatives. Sistah Vegan is not about preaching veganism or vegan fundamentalism. Rather, the book is about how a group of black-identified female vegans perceive nutrition, food, ecological sustainability, health and healing, animal rights, parenting, social justice, spirituality, hair care, race, gender-identification, womanism, and liberation that all go against the (refined and bleached) grain of our dysfunctional society. Thought-provoking for the identification and dismantling of environmental racism, ecological devastation, and other social injustices, Sistah Vegan is an in-your-face handbook for our time. It calls upon all of us to make radical changes for the betterment of ourselves, our planet, and by extension everyone.

The World Peace Diet by Will Tuttle, Ph.D.

Food is our most intimate and telling connection both with the living natural order and with our living cultural heritage. By eating the plants and animals of our earth, we literally incorporate them. It is also through this act of eating that we partake of our culture’s values and paradigms at the most primal levels. It is becoming increasingly obvious, however, that the choices we make about our food are leading to environmental degradation, enormous human health problems, and unimaginable cruelty toward our fellow creatures.

Change of Heart What Psychology Can Teach Us About Spreading Social Change by Nick Cooney

Should anti-war protestors use graphic images to get public support for their cause, or will such images turn the public off? In encouraging the public to adopt sustainable behaviors, should environmental organizations ask for small changes like using fluorescent light bulbs or big changes like giving up cars? Why do most Americans say they oppose the cruel practices of factory farms and sweatshops yet still buy products from these places? And how can non-profits get more people to say yes to their requests to volunteer, donate, recycle, write a letter to a political prisoner, support gay rights, go vegetarian, conserve energy or make other positive changes?

Main Street Vegan:  Everything You Need to Know to Eat Healthfully and Live Compassionately:   Victoria Moran

Farm Sanctuary, Changing Hearts & Minds by Gene Baur

Many people picture cows, sheep, pigs, and chickens as friendly creatures who live happily within the confines of a peaceful family farm, arriving as food for humans only at the end of their sun-drenched lives. That’s what Gene Baur had been told — but when he first visited a stockyard he realized that this rosy depiction couldn’t be more inaccurate.
Amid the stench, noise, and filth, his attention was drawn in particular to one sheep who had been cast aside for dead. But as Baur walked by, the sheep raised her head and looked right at him. She was still alive, and the one thing Baur knew for sure that day was that he had to get her to safety. Hilda, as she was later named, was nursed back to health and soon became the first resident of Farm Sanctuary — an organization dedicated to the rescue, care, and protection of farm animals.

Committed by Dan Matthews

Committed is a bold, offbeat, globe-trotting memoir that shows how the most ridiculed punching bag in high school became an internationally renowned crusader for the most downtrodden individuals of all — animals. This irresistibly entertaining book recounts the random incidents and soul-searching that inspired a reluctant party boy to devote his life to a cause, without ever abandoning his sense of mischief and fun.

“Everyone has a tense moment in their career that makes them wonder, how the hell did I get into this mess?” writes Mathews. “For me, it was when I was dressed as a carrot to promote vegetarianism outside an elementary school in Des Moines, and a pack of obese pig farmers showed up and peeled off slices of bologna for kids to throw at me.” As the irreverent force behind the colorful crusades carried out by People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA), one of the most effective and enduring pressure groups in the world, Mathews has strutted naked before a fur convention in Tokyo, halted GM’s use of animals in crash tests by storming the carmaker’s float in the Rose Parade dressed as a rabbit, and crashed a fashion show in Milan dressed as a priest. With self-deprecating wit and candor, Mathews reveals all the edgy details of his unorthodox coming-of-age and equally outrageous career.”

Dominion:  The Power of Man, the Suffering of Animals, and the Call to Mercy, by Matthew Scully

“And God said, Let us make man in our image, after our likeness; and let them have dominion over the fish of the sea, and over the fowl of the air, and over the cattle, and over all the earth, and over every creeping thing that creepeth upon the earth.”–Genesis 1:24-26

In this crucial passage from the Old Testament, God grants mankind power over animals. But with this privilege comes the grave responsibility to respect life, to treat animals with simple dignity and compassion.  Somewhere along the way, something has gone wrong.

Nature Ethics, by Marti Kiel
Running, Eating, Thinking:  A Vegan Anthology by Martin Rowe
    Martin Rowe, president of Lantern Books (and a runner and vegan), noticed the ubiquity of vegan runners these days, and asked, why? Suspecting there was something to the phenomenon beyond simply the idea that a plant-based diet is beneficial for performance, he sought to pinpoint that something. 

A Plate of Resistance: Vegetarianism as a Response to World Violence, by Helene Defossez
When she was eight years old, Hélène Defossez experienced something that would change her forever: Out on a farm in the French countryside, she witnessed the beheading of a rabbit. What started out as a pang of childish pity eventually grew into a lifelong philosophy, a fundamental choice to refuse to consume animal flesh. In this personal manifesto, Defossez talks about her decision to adopt a plant-based diet, what it means in today’s society, and the positive consequences that such a choice entails.

Accidental Activist, by Matt Ball    Not every activist starts out with the goal of changing the world. Some have their life shaped by chance, quirks of timing, and strange coincidences. And an unwillingness—or simple inability—to fully ignore the horrors perpetrated on animals today. Since Matt Ball learned of factory farms well over a quarter century ago, his journey has been anything but linear. Instead, his evolution has been fraught with denial, regression, conflicts, and failures.

The Oxen at the Intersection, by Patrice Jones
When Green Mountain College in Poultney, Vermont, announced that two oxen called Bill and Lou would be killed and turned into hamburgers despite their years of service as unofficial college and town mascots, pattrice jones and her colleagues at nearby VINE Sanctuary offered an alternative scenario: to allow the elderly bovines to retire to the sanctuary. What transpired after this simple offer was a catastrophe of miscommunication, misdirection, and misinterpretations, as the college dug in its heels, activists piled on, and social media erupted.

The Elephants in the Room:  An Excavation, by Martin Rowe
Through the lens of Rowe’s relationships with two Kenyan conservationists Wangari Maathai and Daphne Sheldrick The Elephants in the Room surveys a number of prejudices that many of us who are fortunate to be born with the privileges attached to our skin color, sex, and access to resources don’t like to deal with: race, misogyny, and the legacy of empire. By examining the two women’s memoirs (Unbowed and Love, Life, and Elephants), both of which were launched following talks at the American Museum of Natural History in New York City, these metaphorical elephants in the room are combined with a study of the exploitation of actual elephants on the continent of Africa, and the iterations of memory that are disclosed or hidden in the writing of memoirs and the collecting of bones for museums.

Cookbooks:

Vegan Planet by Robin Robertson
Very Vegan (Christmas cookies) by Ellen Brown
Vegan Vittles by Jo Stepaniak
Vegan Holiday Kitchen by Nava Atlas
The Garden of Vegan by Tanya Barnard & Sarah Kramer
Crazy, Sexy Diet by Kris Carr
Reboot by Joe Cross
Isa Does It

The Complete Guide To Vegan Food Substitutions:  Celine Steen & Joni Newman

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